No Fridge Challenge Day 6: Eating is cheating

Standard

Apologies for the late post, I was otherwise occupied last night.

Ok, if you must know, I was out “having the night of my life with HANSON!”

Hanson

“When you get old and start losing your hair, the girls of Sydney will still care”.

One of my oldest and dearest friends, Rachael, is a mad Hanson fan (and yes, I intentionally used the word “is” rather than “was”). Rachael attended the concert the night before, managing to impressively tick off the absolute ultimate of all of her bucket list items by actually meeting them.

*Insert incoherent squeal here*

With other people’s bucket list items being ticked of left and right, it is with renewed vigour that I return to my own list

As I approach the end of my 7 day No Fridge Challenge, it occurs to me that I really have gone about it all the wrong way.

When my sister-in-law, Sandy, issued me with the No Fridge Challenge, I didn’t give it much thought. I just whacked it on the list and went on my merry way, saving it for another day.

As it came time to take the challenge on, I approached it with my typical blind enthusiasm. I even went so far as to ban myself from all modern cooking appliances (excluding the humble cooktop). I extended the challenge to not only live without my own fridge, but effectively live without any fridge, excluding the refrigerated trucks that transport our fruit and veg from A to B.

I now see that all of this was a huge mistake.

Now that I have had time to consider the intent behind the challenge, I can see that Sandy was not really trying to see if I could live without all of these appliances. She was trying to see if I could commit to a whole week of fresh food and clean living. The intent, then, was not to live without a fridge per se, but to live without the convenience of prepackaged, store-bought meals and ageing leftovers.

The problem is that by banning the fridge in all of its many forms, I have effectively done the exact opposite, living on tinned food and other bomb shelter staples rather than enjoying fresh produce (which is, I’ve come to discover, invariably refrigerated in some form). So, instead of fresh sushi I’ve eaten muesli bars. Instead of snap frozen peas retaining all their vitamins and goodness, I’ve opted for the fading tinned variety. Instead of an ice-cold can of coke, I’ve downed it at room temperature. Surely this was not the point of the challenge?

In hindsight, I probably should have consulted more closely with Sandy before embarking on my misguided venture. I’m sure then that I would have whinged less and enjoyed a far healthier diet. Instead, I have gone all gung-ho to my own detriment. I set so many unnecessary obstacles for myself that, in the end, it literally did feel as though “eating was cheating”. There are, as I’ve come to understand, very few foods that have not enjoyed refrigeration at some point. I’ve no doubt that even the tinned peas were carted, un-tinned, from the farm to the factory. I’ve therefore had to turn a bit of a blind eye so that I could eat at all.

In spite of missing the point on this challenge, this past week so far has served to highlight how very reliant I am on the humble fridge. I’ve come to understand that refrigeration sits at the heart of clean, fresh living. This is particularly true in a country like Australia, where I’m sure all of us have experienced the kind of summer swelter that only one’s head into the refrigerator at regular intervals can alleviate.

I am now approaching the end of the seventh day of my challenge. Only time will tell if I make it the whole 7 days or attack the ice cream on the approach to midnight snacking time.

Stay tuned…

Which modern appliance could you simply not live without?

Advertisements

6 responses »

  1. Woooooooo!!
    I’m so glad you got to experience the awesomeness of a Hanson concert, whoop whoop!
    Oh, and well done on almost finishing your challenge 🙂
    In the spirit of all things musical, I would struggle to live without my iPod (slash phone slash iPad or music playing device). I love and would miss music (not just Hanson!) too much.

    • I can’t imagine a world without my iPhone! I went 4 hours without it one day by accident and I kept reaching into my bag and getting re-disappointed each time I realised it wasn’t there!

  2. Well, I’m glad you figured out what it’s all about, but it also seems you missed out on learning about the real storage requirements of the great majority of food. The refrigerator doesn’t provide the best environment for many foods. Take gourds (squash, cucumber, melons), for instance, they do better outside of the fridge, even once cut. Most fruits do better in a cool, but not cold environment, and veggies need more humidity than the crispers provide.

    I am slowly learning about all this and doing small experiments with food storage before I take the plunge and sell my fridge.So far, I haven’t wasted anyfood, and I haven’t changed a thing about how I eat. nowif I can only get the berries figured out!! I can only imagine how quiet it’s going to be!

    Anyway, good for you for trying! It sounds like you’ve learnt a lot. 🙂

      • Is it? To be honest, I’m a little scared, and there’s a part of me checking in on my sanity level i.e. is this really realistic? But then there’s only a very small amount of food in my 19cuft fridge – maybe enough to fill 1 or 2 cu ft, including what’s in my freezer, and some of that doesn’t need to be in the fridge at all either. I thought of a smaller, more compact fridge, but then the more I research food storage, the smaller and smaller the fridge was getting until I began considering getting rid of it all together.

        Good luck on persuing the rest of your adventures! It sounds like the iPhone one might be the hardest. 😉

      • Well I suppose you can always go out and get a fridge again if you get desperate! I’m definitely addicted to my technology but I’m surround can last one weekend (I hope!)

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s